The Pain of Mohair

As discussed in yesterday’s post, I have serious yarn problems. Part of the lot of 111 skeins that I got off of EBay, was A LOT of vintage yarn…seriously…the manufacture date on some of this yarn was the early 70s. And there was one beautiful gem in the lot…a few skeins of Lion Brand Imagine, Norwegian Woods. Now, Imagine still exists, but it is now an acrylic / wool / nylon blend. But, back in the day, Imagine was an acrylic / mohair blend.

Man, if you have never felt a mohair sweater, scarf, stuffed animal…you are really missing out on some amazingly soft, fuzzy yarn. But, if you have worked with it…you understand why it was discontinued. This stuff catches on everything. It is a nightmare if you make a mistake, because there is a pretty darn good chance that you are not getting that yarn separated from itself. I cannot even think about how much pain I went through with this yarn trying to correct minor errors.

Lion Brand does make another mohair, Moonlight Mohair. It is actually more mohair, less acrylic, even softer, and easier to work with. It has definitely come a long way since Imagine.

But, let’s get back to the Imagine yarn, with it’s pretty blue/gray/brown colors. For anyone who knows me, you know that I am all about earth tones and neutral colors. Being pasty white, I do not have much of a choice in the matter, so luckily I really like them.

In my boredom and frantic rage to create things for the Funky Finds craft fair last December, I started throwing skeins of anything soft that I could find in my travel bag and worked on scarves, hats, blankets, whatever, anywhere I went. Well, not knowing what mohair was or how hard it is to work with, I threw this in there before a long road trip once. What I also didn’t realize was that due to the small gauge of the yarn, I needed a really tiny hook, which made it all the more painful.

I started working on this scarf. It had a beautiful pattern, initially. But, I kept finding all sorts of mistakes and errors and having to frog large portions of the scarf. So, I did what any good yarn worker does…I turned my mistakes into a pattern and pretended like it was supposed to look like that. The pictures do not show the difference too well, I need to take better ones, but the ends of both sides of the scarf are more open, light, pretty. The rest is a solid piece, HDC, I believe. Life was much easier once I stopped trying to be fancy.

mohair scarf

kids scarf

winter scarf

Kid’s 40″ Mohair Scarf

The problem then, was that I had not used nearly all of this yarn. I still had so much…and I did not want to do anything else difficult with it. So, I went back to an old familiar, as I always do when I am at a struggle fro what to make. The result was the cutest, softest, cuddliest elephant ever. He is tiny, just 3in tall, but man oh man is he sweet. I am actually a little afraid that this guy will sell. Which would be great, he deserves a loving home, but heartbreaking to have to part with him. I left him blind on purpose…I just could not find a yarn for his eyes that did him justice. Everything just looked wrong…so here he is, in his blind, fuzzy splendor. Gawk all you want. I am quite proud of myself on this one.

amigurumi elephant

mohair elephant

3″ mohair elephant

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2 thoughts on “The Pain of Mohair

  1. Do you ever use yarn with alpaca in it? There are many woven blankets here in Ecuador made with a small amount of alpaca. After weaving, the creator uses a thorny thingy to comb the blanket and it makes the alpaca come out and be noticed.

    Like

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